April Book Club: Where the Mountain Meets the Moon

The NYCSLA book club returns after a brief hiatus with our April and May picks! This April we will be reading the middle grade fantasy title, Where the Mountain Meets the Moon by Grace Lin, also a Newbery Honor book. (In May, we’ll be reading How to Say Goodbye in Robot by Natalie Standiford, a quirky realistic fiction title for young adults that has been featured on many 2009 “best of” lists.

Here’s a brief description of Where the Mountain Meets the Moon from Lin’s web site:

In the valley of Fruitless mountain, a young girl named Minli lives in a ramshackle hut with her parents. In the evenings, her father regales her with old folktales of the Jade Dragon and the Old Man of the Moon, who knows the answers to all of life’s questions. Inspired by these stories, Minli sets off on an extraordinary journey to find the Old Man of the Moon to ask him how she can change her family’s fortune. She encounters an assorted cast of characters and magical creatures along the way, including a dragon who accompanies her on her quest for the ultimate answer.

Please add your comments about April’s pick here, and we welcome you to revisit past discussions of our other great reads to add your thoughts.

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One Response to April Book Club: Where the Mountain Meets the Moon

  1. Sara says:

    This was an adorable little book of hinged stories, almost like an accordian. One thing I thought in the book is how appearances are deceptive, how we don’t really know who other people are. The fish man was just a peddlar, but turned out to be so much more complex. Even the dragon herself. The motif of the pearl I have never encountered in my folktale reading and that was a delight. But fortune lies in being with others, in right relationship, and craving no more. For anything. Not to be rich, but to not want something other than you have, or more, or less, or further, or closer. A must read. Thoughtful, delightful, light, but meaningful.

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